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Tricky Word Guidance

 
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MatthewC



Joined: 27 Jan 2016
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 1:49 pm    Post subject: Tricky Word Guidance Reply with quote

Hello again

I'm trying to help my 6 year old son with his reading and writing. It turns out he has problems with 'visual processing', which I think is one of the features of dyslexia but is not classed as such.

I do a quick session with him a day, sometimes twice if he has the energy, and I incorporate some of he PI material and techniques. Early days yet, but I am positive about that.

My question is: with 'tricky' words, or words that are not obviously phonetically regular or decodable, what is the guidance? These present more of a difficulty for him as he has an issue remembering things visually.
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debbie



Joined: 08 Oct 2007
Posts: 2444
Location: UK

PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2016 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another great question!

In England, the emphasis is very much on studying any word considered 'tricky' to notice the letters and letter groups that are straightforward and the letters and letter groups that are 'tricky' or 'unusual' or 'haven't been taught yet'!

Even unusually-spelled words have some straightforward letter/s-sound correspondences which can help the reader.

So, as the teaching/supporting adult, just point to those graphemes (letters and letter groups) that cause no difficulty and provide the correct 'sounds' for those, and then you can point to the tricky bit - or even underline it if it is written on paper on in an exercise book (and I suggest that if you don't already work with an exercise book with lines at home, that you start to do so!) and say, 'In this word, these letters are code for the /ee/ sound' - or whatever the missing 'sound' is.

I provide this mantra for introducing new code, or unusual code, in any written word here:

http://www.phonicsinternational.com/FR_PI_straight.pdf

If you've got a printer, print this off to remind you of what to say.

I also provide various lists of words as free posters on my 'Free Resources' page if anyone reads this post and is not aware.

It helps to add any new words with tricky bits onto a display board - even at home! The more exposure to such words, the better.
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Debbie Hepplewhite
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MatthewC



Joined: 27 Jan 2016
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2016 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks again Debbie - apologies, thought I had replied to this and realised I hadn't when I logged on this morning!
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